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Pasta Carbonara Recipe

Pasta Carbonara Recipe



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This easy pasta dish is a game changer

You'll love this creamy pasta, rich with artichoke and bacon flavor.

Ingredients

8 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces*
3 large eggs, beaten to blend
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 1/2 8-ounce packages frozen artichoke hearts, thawed, quartered
1 tsp. dried crushed red pepper
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup grated parmesan cheese (about 3 ounces)
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 cups plain Oikos Organic Greek Yogurt
1 lb. fettuccine

Directions

Cook pasta according to package. Cook al dente. Drain, reserve 2 cups of pasta water. In a large fry pan cook bacon to a crisp. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and place on paper towel. Combine eggs, 1 cup of the pasta water, yogurt, and parmesan. Whisk together. Add 1/4 cup of olive oil to bacon grease on medium heat. Add minced garlic and artichoke hearts. Sauté until garlic is cooked. Add pasta and bacon and stir until pasta is coated with oil. Slowly whisk egg mixture into pasta, adding more pasta water if needed. Add parsley, red pepper, black pepper, and salt. Mix. Place on serving platter and garnish with parsley leaves. *Tip: Bacon is easier to slice if it is slightly frozen.


The Simplest Pasta Carbonara Recipe Ever

Just about everyone loves a bowl of pasta alla carbonara. The dish originated in Rome in the mid-20th-century, and it's still one of the most popular pasta dishes in Italy and the United States. Registered dietician Kristen Carli is also a food writer and recipe developer, and she shared her easy recipe for pasta carbonara with Mashed. Traditionally, pasta carbonara (also called spaghetti carbonara) has only a handful of ingredients, and Carli's recipe sticks to that tried-and-true formula.

She uses Italian techniques for whipping up this incredibly satisfying dish in less than 30 minutes. Carli takes a couple of shortcuts that will save you even more time, so her pasta carbonara recipe can be made any night of the week as a family meal or as a separate course for a special date-night dinner. If you've never made pasta carbonara before, you'll be amazed at how something this simple can taste so delicioso!


Ultimate spaghetti carbonara recipe

Finely chop the 100g pancetta, having first removed any rind. Finely grate 50g pecorino cheese and 50g parmesan and mix them together.

Beat the 3 large eggs in a medium bowl and season with a little freshly grated black pepper. Set everything aside.

Add 1 tsp salt to the boiling water, add 350g spaghetti and when the water comes back to the boil, cook at a constant simmer, covered, for 10 minutes or until al dente (just cooked).

Squash 2 peeled plump garlic cloves with the blade of a knife, just to bruise it.

While the spaghetti is cooking, fry the pancetta with the garlic. Drop 50g unsalted butter into a large frying pan or wok and, as soon as the butter has melted, tip in the pancetta and garlic.

Leave to cook on a medium heat for about 5 minutes, stirring often, until the pancetta is golden and crisp. The garlic has now imparted its flavour, so take it out with a slotted spoon and discard.

Keep the heat under the pancetta on low. When the pasta is ready, lift it from the water with a pasta fork or tongs and put it in the frying pan with the pancetta. Don’t worry if a little water drops in the pan as well (you want this to happen) and don’t throw the pasta water away yet.

Mix most of the cheese in with the eggs, keeping a small handful back for sprinkling over later.

Take the pan of spaghetti and pancetta off the heat. Now quickly pour in the eggs and cheese. Using the tongs or a long fork, lift up the spaghetti so it mixes easily with the egg mixture, which thickens but doesn’t scramble, and everything is coated.

Add extra pasta cooking water to keep it saucy (several tablespoons should do it). You don’t want it wet, just moist. Season with a little salt, if needed.

Use a long-pronged fork to twist the pasta on to the serving plate or bowl. Serve immediately with a little sprinkling of the remaining cheese and a grating of black pepper. If the dish does get a little dry before serving, splash in some more hot pasta water and the glossy sauciness will be revived.


I always do all my prep before I start cooking — a lesson I learned the hard way the first time I tried to make a carbonara.

Once you really get cooking with a carbonara, things need to be mixed together very quickly to achieve maximum creaminess (and to ensure you won't be eating any raw egg).

So this time around, I wanted to make sure I had every single step prepped so that I wouldn't be stressed once it was time to put the pasta together.

To start, I cut my asparagus into two-inch pieces and diagonally sliced my scallions, as Garten had instructed.


Equipment


Step 11

Photo: Claudia Concas

Add the crispy guanciale, stir one last time and serve your original spaghetti carbonara immediately.

Our advice: no chives, parsley or basil should be added to the carbonara pasta. The real recipe does not include the use of aromatic herbs.

History and origins

Carbonara is a typical recipe of the Lazio region, more precisely from the city of Rome. The history of this ancient dish is still uncertain, but the most accredited hypothesis is that it appeared on Italian tables around 1944, when American soldiers were looking for familiar ingredients to feed themselves (eggs, bacon, spaghetti). The first version was not like the carbonara we know today, but some cooks, seeing the concoction prepared by the soldiers, created the recipe that has successfully survived until today.

Types of pasta to use for carbonara

The Roman tradition provides for the use of spaghetti or rigatoni pasta for carbonara. The more creative versions and the natural evolution of this dish have also led to the use of penne rigate and potato gnocchi. The use of fresh egg pasta, such as tagliolini and tagliatelle, is certainly more American, and the result is still passable. Stuffed pasta is also excellent, such as ravioli, stuffed with egg yolk and pecorino cheese and then seasoned with guanciale and its fat, pecorino cheese and pepper (the classic gricia sauce, another typical Roman dish).

Alternatives

The alternatives to the classic carbonara are innumerable. There are those who prepare a vegetarian version, eliminating the guanciale and replacing it with asparagus, peas or zucchini. Even the guanciale, a typical dried meat from the Lazio area of ​​Amatrice, is often replaced with pancetta. Although considered almost a heresy by purists of the Italian culinary tradition, the result is just as tasty.

There are also versions of carbonara without eggs, just create a cream with spreadable cheese and saffron (or turmeric). Pecorino is a pungent cheese, some mix it or even replace it with Parmigiano Reggiano for a slightly more delicate version of the recipe.

Conclusions

Carbonara should be eaten immediately to enjoy all its flavours and creaminess. The only way to enjoy it at its best is to prepare it on the spot. Also, discover the amatriciana recipe.


Pasta Carbonara

Put a large saucepot of water on to boil. Add a liberal amount of salt and the pasta. Cook to al dente, about 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the EVOO (enough to coat bottom of the pan) and pancetta. Brown the pancetta for 2 minutes. Add the red pepper flakes and garlic and cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the wine and stir up all the pan drippings.

In a separate bowl, beat the egg yolks, then add 1 large ladleful (about 1/2 cup) of the starchy cooking water. This tempers the eggs and keeps them from scrambling when added to the pasta.

Drain the pasta well and add it directly to the skillet with pancetta and oil. Pour the egg mixture over the pasta. Toss rapidly to coat the pasta without cooking the egg. Remove the pan from the heat and add a big handful of cheese, lots of pepper and a little salt. Continue to toss and turn the pasta until it soaks up the egg mixture and thickens, 1-2 minutes. Garnish with parsley and extra grated Romano.


Pasta Carbonara

Classic bacon-and-egg pasta with the yummy addition of peas. Nothing better on earth.

pieces thick cut bacon (diced small)

whole medium onion, diced small

Salt and plenty of black pepper

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions.
  2. While the pasta is cooking, fry the bacon until just barely crisp. Remove from the pan and drain on paper towels. Pour off all of the bacon grease, but don't clean the pan. Return the pan to the stove over medium-low heat and throw in the onions and garlic. Cook until golden brown. Set aside.
  3. In a bowl, mix together eggs, Parmesan, cream, and salt and pepper until smooth.
  4. When the pasta is done, reserve a cup or two of the pasta water. Drain the pasta and place it in a bowl. While the pasta is still really hot, slowly drizzle in the egg mixture, stirring the pasta the whole time. The sauce will become thick and should coat the pasta. Splash in a little hot pasta water if needed for consistency.
  5. Halfway through, add the peas, bacon, and sauteed onion/garlic. Finish adding the sauce, stirring until it's all combined.
  6. Serve immediately with extra Parmesan. Delish!

I can&rsquot eat, think about, dream about, or even remotely consider Pasta Carbonara without thinking of Heartburn, the Meryl Streep/Jack Nicholson movie from the eighties that I both love and hate. Love, because it&rsquos incredibly written by Nora Ephron and incredibly acted by Meryl and Jack. And Stockard. And because Carly Simon sings the songs. And because Meryl and Jack feast on Pasta Carbonara on the night of their first date.

Hate, because man, does their relationship get hit by a train. It makes my heart burn.

I made Pasta Carbonara Sunday evening.

First off, cook the pasta. Long noodles are best.

Next, grab some thick-cut bacon and slice the pieces in half down the middle&hellip

Then dice it up into pretty small pieces&hellip

And throw it into a skillet over medium heat.

Cook it until it&rsquos just starting to crisp&hellip

And remove it to a plate lined with a paper towel.

Pour out most of the grease in the pan and set it back on the stove over low heat.

Dice up an onion pretty finely&hellip

And mince up 2 to 3 cloves of garlic.

Throw the onion and garlic into the skillet and cook &rsquoem low and slow over several minutes.


The trick to making a successful carbonara?

Stirring the egg mixture quickly into the pasta which should be hot enough to "cook" the egg to make a sauce but not so hot as to make it curdle.

Getting carbonara just right can take some practice so don't despair if your carbonara sauce is a little lumpy the first time you make it.

Some people add cream to their carbonara. It's not traditional, but you can certainly do this, and make an even creamier sauce for the pasta. Personally, I think it's rich enough without it. Enjoy!


Related Video

my spaghetti carbonra was dry also, but having viewed other recipe saved a portion of hot water i used boiled the noodles in added that to the mixture. I also added three table spoon olive oil,additional garlic and onions. I mixed crean, egg and cheese and let sit while cooked the (thick cut pepper) bacon and noodles. I loved the simplicity of the recipe and any one can make.

I shared Solaera's skepticism about butter & cream, & followed her/his suggestions - fabulous! An easy quick meal.

Reviewers have written that the end result of this recipe is too dry and some have mentioned that cream should not be added to carbonara. That is because in a traditional carbonara the sauce is never, never simmered! The egg sauce should be ɼooked' using only the heat of the pasta itself, no cream will then be necessary. If you add eggs to hot, starchy pasta and THEN simmer you will get glop. This dish, prepared tradtionally will have a silky, rich texture without the extra calories that the cream will add. What I do: I use 3-4 WHOLE eggs brought to ROOM TEMP mixed with plenty of fresh ground pepper, a dash of salt and 1/4-1/2 cup of parmesan cheese. Set aside. Saute the bacon in butter if you like, but really, is that necessary? I add a clove of minced garlic and a bit of chopped onion to the bacon after it is almost cooked, just enough to soften them a bit. When my pasta and bacon are done I add my HOT pasta to a HEATED bowl and quickly add my egg mixture and stir in my bacon. No glops. Perfect every time. And yes the eggs will be cooked enough.

There is a much better version of this dish on this website from the March 2003 issue of "Gourmet" magazine. There are flaws in this recipe that lead to its texture and flavor (or lack of it) problems. First, no cream. Second, use all the egg. The whites are mostly water and that will smooth the texture. Third, garlic is needed, and maybe onion. Basically, forget this recipe and use the one I mentioned above.

I was excited to make this recipe as Iɽ wanted to try Spaghetti Carbonara. I was disappointed. I found a lack of taste and the finished product was clumpy, because of the egg and parmesan. I guess I'll continue looking for a recipe that works.

After reading the reviews, I added a little more cream. The receipe was wonderful and my family loved the meal.

This dish was awful! I followed the recipe carefully and I have to say that I was embarrassed to serve it. After a few bites, we all threw it all away. I fix many recipes from Epicurious and most of them are excellent if not outstanding. This was a complete disapointment. It does not deserve to be listed.

Two major complaints. From me: too thick! will remedy next time with less egg and more cream. From the hubby: Not enough bacon! easily fixed:) I added some garlic, basil, pepperflakes and a dash of garlic salt at the end. Will be done again!

I've had this dish in Italy before. This recipe is very delicious and easy to make. We always like to add a good amount of salt and pepper. I added 2 tablespoons of the pasta water to temper the egg/cheese mixture more and combined everything over low heat to ensure no clumping.

this recipe was easy to make and very tasty. I used pancetta instead of bacon and it made all the difference. I also used a little bit of light cream to moisten but didn't need much of it. I added peas at the end which was a nice touch.

Spectacular! This is unbelievably easy and tastes so good! I've made it without the bacon and it's equally delicious (just takes a little extra butter). Pasta carbonara may not have any cream in the authentic sense, but this is a great dish. We served it once with some roasted pork tenderloin, another time with chicken breast . great every time! And yes, it can get dry sometimes, so I just use a couple extra spoons of the cream and it works for me.

For those who want to know how to make it moister. always keep about 1 or 2 cups of the water when you drain the pasta. after you mix the pasta and the sauce, if it becomes to dry, you stir-in some of that water. it works with all the creamy sauce pasta.

OK, OK, it's not "authentic"--at this point I'm focusing less on "authentic" and more on "what my family will eat." but I sauteed onion and garlic in the bacon fat and added that, plus some petite (frozen--thawed) green peas, plus LOTS of cracked black pepper. I also added a bit more cream to loosen the sauce. It was fab and I'll make it again.

I loved this recipe, because it was very quick to make, used ingredients I always have on hand, and it tastes great! Next time I will plate it up a little sooner so that the sauce doesn't evaporate as much. I topped each serving with lots of extra cheese.

It's a good dish, but bland. Next time I will be using the following recipe that I saw made in a Roman restaurant on food TV's $40 a day. You can use thick cut bacon instead of the pancetta and parmesan instead of the romano for a cost effective meal. Spaghetti Carbonara Recipe courtesy Enotcea Corsi, Rome Italy 1 pound spaghetti 4 eggs 1 teaspoon black pepper 3 teaspoons Pecorino Romano, plus extra, for serving 2 teaspoons cream, optional 3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 slices pancetta Boil the spaghetti in salted water until it is al dente. Drain and set aside. Beat the eggs. Add the black pepper and cheese to the beaten eggs. Set aside. Add cream to this mixture, if desired, for a creamier dish. Put the oil in a saucepan with the pancetta, and saute for 5 minutes. Add the spaghetti into the pan and saute for another 3 minutes. Turn off the flame (this is important) and add the egg and cheese mixture to the pasta and mix. Serve with additional Pecorino Romano on top.

I thought this was very good, but my husband thought it was too dry. Any suggestions on how to keep it moist? My children thought it was great, but again, by the end of the meal they were swigging their milk to get it to go down!

I added more cheese and cream, and some oregano. Simply divine, friends and family loved it.

I have always loved Spaghetti Carbonara as the ultimate comfort food. When I lived in Vienna, I came across a recipe which has never failed me -- just like this one -- except add a pinch or two of nutmeg. You can also make this with plain old boiled ham browned in butter instead of bacon.

I prefer Italian restaurateur Romeo Salta's recipe from: "The Pleasures of Italian Cooking" Macmillan New York, London 3 slices bacon, cut julienne (pancetta, better yet) 4 tablespoons butter. 1/2 cup julienne-cut prosciutto (Parma prosciutto) 2 egg yolks. 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese (Reggiano) 1 pound spaghetti, cooked and drained (Italian imported such as DeCecco or Barilla) Brown the bacon in the butter mix in the prosciutto until lightly browned. Beat the egg yolks, then stir in 1/4 cup of the cheese. Toss the hot spaghetti with bacon mixture, then immediately with the egg yolk mixture. (personal note: don't let the egg harden) Serve quickly sprinkled with the remaining cheese. Serves: 4-6 (Personal note: No cream, no garlic, no shallots, only fresh ground pepper at pleasure)

Definitely NOT for the cholesterol conscious cook! This was by far the best, and simplest, carbonara I've ever had. Some of the previous reviewers were right, though. It was a little bland. I added some red pepper flakes to the bacon while it was cooking and some more to the sauce. next time I'll probably add some garlic as well

The BEST carbonara recipe I've come across! Just like my mom's! Always a hit, and I've tried them all. For a nice variant, use 1/2 lb of pancetta instead of bacon, and 3/4 parmesean + 1/4 asagio. You won't be disappointed!

This is a great beginner recipe, and allows lots of room for creativity. I have a strong feeling that this will evolve into something spectacular with a little added spice, and a couple days of rest in the refigerator. Always better the second day. Pieropan Soave Classico accompanies this meal very well.

I would make it again, but there would have to be some additions. The recipe as written is bland, so I added more Kosher Salt and Black Pepper, but still wasn't satisfied. My partner finally threw in some hot sauce. Perhaps it needs a bit of flavoring from some sort of herb, like anise, or italian parsley.

Wonderfully rich and delicious. Enjoy a small portion as a first course or small meal. If you're fat-gram obsessed, try Lean Cuisine. just don't tinker with this recipe! As with any pasta dish with few ingredients, this one succeeds only when you use the best quality ingredients (don't even think about using the cheese from the green can!) and don't skimp on the fat. The only change I made was to add a tiny pinch of red pepper flakes to help wake up all the flavors. I believe the original Italian recipe calls for pancetta, but I used the super-rich, super-smoky Nueske bacon with amazing results.


Ultimate spaghetti carbonara recipe

Finely chop the 100g pancetta, having first removed any rind. Finely grate 50g pecorino cheese and 50g parmesan and mix them together.

Beat the 3 large eggs in a medium bowl and season with a little freshly grated black pepper. Set everything aside.

Add 1 tsp salt to the boiling water, add 350g spaghetti and when the water comes back to the boil, cook at a constant simmer, covered, for 10 minutes or until al dente (just cooked).

Squash 2 peeled plump garlic cloves with the blade of a knife, just to bruise it.

While the spaghetti is cooking, fry the pancetta with the garlic. Drop 50g unsalted butter into a large frying pan or wok and, as soon as the butter has melted, tip in the pancetta and garlic.

Leave to cook on a medium heat for about 5 minutes, stirring often, until the pancetta is golden and crisp. The garlic has now imparted its flavour, so take it out with a slotted spoon and discard.

Keep the heat under the pancetta on low. When the pasta is ready, lift it from the water with a pasta fork or tongs and put it in the frying pan with the pancetta. Don’t worry if a little water drops in the pan as well (you want this to happen) and don’t throw the pasta water away yet.

Mix most of the cheese in with the eggs, keeping a small handful back for sprinkling over later.

Take the pan of spaghetti and pancetta off the heat. Now quickly pour in the eggs and cheese. Using the tongs or a long fork, lift up the spaghetti so it mixes easily with the egg mixture, which thickens but doesn’t scramble, and everything is coated.

Add extra pasta cooking water to keep it saucy (several tablespoons should do it). You don’t want it wet, just moist. Season with a little salt, if needed.

Use a long-pronged fork to twist the pasta on to the serving plate or bowl. Serve immediately with a little sprinkling of the remaining cheese and a grating of black pepper. If the dish does get a little dry before serving, splash in some more hot pasta water and the glossy sauciness will be revived.